Winner of the James Beard/ KitchenAid Cookbook of the Year 2000 and Winner of the Beard Award for the Best Writing on Food 2000.
 
 
June 27, 2017
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Bastila: A Grand Moroccan Pigeon Pie
Bastila
(Fowl)
Spiced pigeon or other birds with eggs, almonds, and saffron, wrapped in phyllo-like pastry as a pie
posted: 01/10/2007

Beets with Orange Blossom Water and Moroccan Spices
(Salads)
Boiled beets with orange blossom water, scallions, paprika, cinnamon, and cumin
posted: 12/11/2008

Chickpeas with Preserved Lemon
Hummus bi’l-Hamad Muraqqad
(Antipasto, Meze, Tapas, and Hors d'Oeuvres)
Chickpeas with preserved lemons seasoned with garlic, saffron and other spices
posted: 09/06/2010

Couscous with Chicken, Chickpeas, and Caramelized Onions
Siksu bi'l-Dajaj wa'l-Hummus
(Rice, Couscous, and Other Grains)
Couscous with tender chicken, chickpeas, caramelized onions, almonds and spices
posted: 12/06/2007

Fava Bean Purée in the Moroccan Style
Rafissa al-Ful
(Antipasto, Meze, Tapas, and Hors d'Oeuvres)
Pureed fava beans with cumin, paprika, and olive oil
posted: 05/31/2012

Lamb and Golden Raisin Stew
Qamama
(Stews)
Dry-stewed lamb with golden raisins and Moroccan spices
posted: 10/03/2008

Moroccan Fish Stew
Tajin bi'l-Hut
(Stews)
Dry stew (étouffée)of fish, potatoes, tomatoes, and green bell peppers
posted: 01/10/2007

Moroccan Tomato Salad
Salatat Mishwiyya
(Salads)
Mixed spiced salad of tomatoes and chiles
posted: 04/16/2008

Preserved Lemons
(Basic Recipes and Sauces)
Lemons preserved in salt and lemon juice for Moroccan dishes
posted: 01/10/2007

Ras al-Hanut (Ras El Hanout)
Ras al-Hanut (Ras El Hanout)
(Basic Recipes and Sauces)
Mixed spices for Moroccan recipes
posted: 01/10/2007



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This vast compendium [Little Foods of the Mediterranean] encapsulates the type of Mediterranean food that I love: simple, tasty, unpretentious, and easy to eat.  Whether they are tapas, meze, or antipasti, they represent Mediterranean street food at its best.  I especially applaud Clifford Wright’s great research into the similarities and the differences among the little foods of the eighteen countries of the Mediterranean Basin.
- Jacques Pépin, chef, cookbook author, and public television show host


Just like what’s happening with barbecue and grilling books (and Italian cookbooks), publishers feel obliged to regularly come out with books covering the same subject over and over again. This is because it is difficult to keep books in print, and older books (with a few exceptions, like The Joy of Cooking) are simply not as marketable as newer books. That said, Wright’s collection of hot and spicy recipes from around the world [Some Like it Hot] is much like the dozens that have come before it. It is comprehensive and the recipes look like they are authentic and complete, with a lot of anecdotal information to delight the reader. ...  Anyone who can write a chapter title like “Hot Chicks, Wicked Ducks, and Killer Rabbits” gets a pat on the back from me! 
- Dave DeWitt, author of The Chile Pepper Encyclopedia; Fiery-Foods.com

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